Sans Cilice

Icon

White Anti-Racism: No Hairshirt Necessary

On the potential of color talk

“Why you and Ms. Shannon both light-skinned?” asked Alicia (not her real name) last Wednesday. Shannon is one of my employees. I’m white and she’s black. Not only that, I’m about as white as white can be– Irish descent, fair skin that sunburns in minutes, bright blue eyes, dirty blond hair (currently dyed brunette). Shannon has light/medium brown skin and dark brown African American hair. I think some would say she’s light-skinned and others wouldn’t. But, there’s really no need to examine our skin shades further; the point is that while Shannon and I may have any number of things in common, skin color is just not one of them.

—Long post! Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: education, Personal, Philosophy & Theory, Society, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ms Magazine Blog!

Thanks to Ta-Nehisi Coates for quoting Annie Shields’ comments about the Ben Roethlesberger rape charges, and thereby reintroducing me to the stellar feminist media that is Ms. Magazine.

Filed under: Internet/Blogosphere, Media & Culture, , , , ,

Dear Mr. President– Yes, You Can!

Ms. Hamedah Hasan’s official plea website.

Filed under: activism, Current Events, Politics, , , , , , , , , ,

Symbolic Reconciliation Between Mother Bethel AME and St. George’s UM

After centuries of separation the congregations of Mother Bethel AME and St. George’s United Methodist will worship together once again as a symbolic gesture of reconciliation and forgiveness.

Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, at Sixth and Pine, is one of the most historically pregnant places in Philly. I’ve been atheist for a long time now, but I still value the history that I learned through my experiences of the city’s religious institutions. Though we never attended AME on a regular basis (my family went to Old St. Joseph’s Jesuit Church), friends of mine did and a few times I attended with my mom. I’m pretty sure we also attended St. George’s a few times, but I don’t remember it well. My grade school and its church, St. Peter’s Episcopal, was two blocks away from all of these religious institutions and this proximity allowed for great field trips in which we learned about how religious tensions shaped Philadelphia history despite freedom of religion being the law.

Like many other nine year old girls of the early 1990’s, I was obsessed with the American Girls doll collection and their corresponding book series. I had Felicity, the Colonial/Revolutionary War red-headed doll– probably because my mom thought she was the most tastefully styled. Felicity’s books were ok, but Addy’s were captivating. Addy was the runaway slave American girl doll. Her books tell the riveting story of her escape with her mother from the plantation all the way to Philadelphia. When they finally arrived in the city, their mentors took them to AME where they received a warm welcome and were helped to find an apartment, clothes and schooling. This pre-adolescent reading experience was highly formative and is definitely a part of why I love of Philadelphia and its historically progressive institutions, one of which is AME.

Filed under: Current Events, education, Personal, Philadelphia News, , , , , , ,

Early College for Students at Risk

SandHoke Early College High School admits only students whose parents do not hold college degrees, and provides them with the opportunity to earn their diploma and two years of college credit for free!

So neat! We need more programs like this. Obama has pushed for student loan reform and has already significantly increased the maximum Pell grant. However, attending a sufficiently rigorous school is still a risky financial decision for most low to middle income students because lenders continue their predatory practices. (Kudos to Stanford for eliminating tuition for all students whose families makes under 100K!) The educational options of poorer students are narrowed even further by the fact that more and more private colleges are eliminating their ‘full-need’ financial aid policies which make it possible for any admitted student to attend regardless of their financial needs.

Filed under: activism, News, Society, , , , ,

My New Job

Zoe and I caught up the other night over dinner. I had been almost completely out of touch with my friends for the past few weeks because I was between cell phones and because I was adjusting to my new job. It was great to talk about my new job with Zoe because she hadn’t already heard about it and because I value her opinion. She asked me if the start of this blog was directly related to the start of my new job. It is definitely coincidental, but the blog really happened because I had a nice amount of free time between jobs than because I explicitly intend(ed) to blog about my new job. That said, both the start of my job and of my blog are definitely related to my realization that social injustice pre-occupies my thoughts and that I am most compelled to respond to injustice that feels close to home. For me, as a white female citizen of Philadelphia (which as of 2000 was 43% black, 42%white, 5%Asian, 5%other, 3%mixed race) the type of injustice that is most frequently and immediately visible is the centuries old anti-black white-supremacist American racism.

After working at the Academy of Natural Sciences for a few years I became confident that a.) the thing I liked most about work was communicating successfully with a wide variety of people and that b.) I spend more time thinking about race than any other issue I consider important because race issues seem to have a more immediate bearing on my life than any other sort of social issue. Looking to leave the museum career path and hoping to get my foot in the door with a community oriented non-profit in Philly, I applied to an administrative assistant job at a non-profit that runs charter schools in the city. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Personal, , , , , , , ,