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White Anti-Racism: No Hairshirt Necessary

Racism at Gloucester County Walmart


Overt indisputable racist intimidation is alleged to have happened at a Gloucester County, NJ Walmart. Obviously this act has not been condoned by the company, but I’m totally fine with hastily (re)judging Walmart’s forest for this tree.

If you aren’t sure about your feelings towards Walmart, give “Walmart:The High Cost of Low Prices” a chance. I wonder if Walmart will aggressively silence this issue like they have charges of sexual discrimination.

Filed under: Current Events, Society, , , , , ,

Stanford’s Progressive Policies

In addition to having an amazing financial policy which pays 100% tuition for students whose families make less than $100K, Stanford University now has the most progressive student health care plan I’ve ever heard of. The university’s mandatory health plan will now provide coverage for students’ transgender surgery. Wow.

Filed under: Current Events, education, , , , ,

Race and Obesity in Philly

Soda, Candy, Hoagies!

Nia-Malika Henderson of Politico reports on Michelle Obama’s appearance in Philadelphia yesterday to discuss the national obesity epidemic as it is manifested in Philadelphia.

Though I know childhood obesity is a problem for Americans of all races, my localized experiences¬† have lead me to associate the issues of race and obesity. Whites are not the majority in my city (most estimates as of 2000 say 41% of Philadelphians are white though others say up to 45%) but–not surprisingly–they enjoy better housing, employment, education and health than others. Blacks are approximately 43% (44% if the mixed race population is added) of the city’s population and account for about 40% of the city’s workforce. Despite the essential contributions the black population makes to the city, it experiences twice the unemployment rate of whites and considerably worse health.

Philadelphia has a long history of obesity. Its longstanding position on Top 10 Fattest City lists (#1 in 1999!) is usually explained by excessive consumption of cheese steaks and soft pretzels. These ‘delicacies’ originated in South Philly, originally a melting pot of Irish, Italian and other European immigrants. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Current Events, education, Personal, Philadelphia News, , , , , , , , ,

2010 Whiter Olympics

Thanks to Zoe M. for linking to White Snow, Brown Rage: The Case Against the Winter Olympics published on Slate. Aside from figure skating, I’ve never had much interest in any of the winter sports, aside from figure skating. And, while I grant that the requirements of figure skating are no less athletically legitimate than those of other Olympic sports (and probably MORE legitimate than those of Shooting), I have always viewed the sport more as a competition of spectacle as opposes to quantifiable ability.

I’m glad people are speaking out against the intertwined racial/geographical exclusion of the winter games; it is absolutely true that, as Raihan Salam puts it, “brown folks hail from largely snowless, tropical climes.” However, I think the selection of sports for the winter games presents as much of a problem within just the US as it does from a global perspective. I don’t care about most winter sports mostly because my family was never wealthy enough to arrange for such excursions and equipment. Most winter sports don’t just require expensive limited-use equipment; for US citizens father than a few hours by car from snowy mountains such activities require entire vacations! Because of this, I don’t think that the winter games have the same capacity to foster a sense of national pride and togetherness. (It’s pretty rare that I advocate for more nationalism…hm) I don’t know how to prove it— might do more research– but I’m sure that the level of enthusiasm within the US for the winter games is markedly lower than it is for the superior summer ones. Thoughts?

Filed under: Current Events, Personal, Pop Culture, Society, , , , , ,

Early College for Students at Risk

SandHoke Early College High School admits only students whose parents do not hold college degrees, and provides them with the opportunity to earn their diploma and two years of college credit for free!

So neat! We need more programs like this. Obama has pushed for student loan reform and has already significantly increased the maximum Pell grant. However, attending a sufficiently rigorous school is still a risky financial decision for most low to middle income students because lenders continue their predatory practices. (Kudos to Stanford for eliminating tuition for all students whose families makes under 100K!) The educational options of poorer students are narrowed even further by the fact that more and more private colleges are eliminating their ‘full-need’ financial aid policies which make it possible for any admitted student to attend regardless of their financial needs.

Filed under: activism, News, Society, , , , ,

My New Job

Zoe and I caught up the other night over dinner. I had been almost completely out of touch with my friends for the past few weeks because I was between cell phones and because I was adjusting to my new job. It was great to talk about my new job with Zoe because she hadn’t already heard about it and because I value her opinion. She asked me if the start of this blog was directly related to the start of my new job. It is definitely coincidental, but the blog really happened because I had a nice amount of free time between jobs than because I explicitly intend(ed) to blog about my new job. That said, both the start of my job and of my blog are definitely related to my realization that social injustice pre-occupies my thoughts and that I am most compelled to respond to injustice that feels close to home. For me, as a white female citizen of Philadelphia (which as of 2000 was 43% black, 42%white, 5%Asian, 5%other, 3%mixed race) the type of injustice that is most frequently and immediately visible is the centuries old anti-black white-supremacist American racism.

After working at the Academy of Natural Sciences for a few years I became confident that a.) the thing I liked most about work was communicating successfully with a wide variety of people and that b.) I spend more time thinking about race than any other issue I consider important because race issues seem to have a more immediate bearing on my life than any other sort of social issue. Looking to leave the museum career path and hoping to get my foot in the door with a community oriented non-profit in Philly, I applied to an administrative assistant job at a non-profit that runs charter schools in the city. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Personal, , , , , , , ,

Constructively Criticising Constructive Criticism of Animal Rights/Welfare Movement

An article titled Five Fatal Flaws of Animal Activism caught my eye. With my earlier post about the mainstream promotion (or lack thereof) of veganism/vegetarianism in mind, I hoped one of the 5 flaws would be the lack of attention and lack of effective/appealing promotion to low-income families and to black Americans. I’m shocked that this idea didn’t make the list. For the shared goals of the animal rights and animal welfare movements¬† to be met, or even just approached, the movements will need to gain traction with people who make food choices based on cost, convenience and habit, with the people who constitue the majority of the country.

Oh well. At least the article slammed PETA for its monotonous naked lady ads… Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Media & Culture, Personal, , , , , ,