Sans Cilice

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White Anti-Racism: No Hairshirt Necessary

On the potential of color talk

“Why you and Ms. Shannon both light-skinned?” asked Alicia (not her real name) last Wednesday. Shannon is one of my employees. I’m white and she’s black. Not only that, I’m about as white as white can be– Irish descent, fair skin that sunburns in minutes, bright blue eyes, dirty blond hair (currently dyed brunette). Shannon has light/medium brown skin and dark brown African American hair. I think some would say she’s light-skinned and others wouldn’t. But, there’s really no need to examine our skin shades further; the point is that while Shannon and I may have any number of things in common, skin color is just not one of them.

—Long post! Read the rest of this entry »

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Filed under: education, Personal, Philosophy & Theory, Society, , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Do You Listen to Jimmy Buffet Records?”

“Because if so, you’re white.”

From The Colbert Report Interview with Nell Irvin Painter, 3/17/2010. 4:40/5:10

I’ll venture to say that this is one of the truer race-based assumptions out there. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: On TV, Philosophy & Theory, Pop Culture, , , , , ,

Huffington Post Starts a Religion Section

I am 100% ambivalent about Huffpo’s new Religion section. While I am in favor of a section for important religion related NEWS, I have been bothered by statements that are dismissive of the atheist population while trying to be inclusive. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Journalism, Personal, , , ,

Stanford’s Progressive Policies

In addition to having an amazing financial policy which pays 100% tuition for students whose families make less than $100K, Stanford University now has the most progressive student health care plan I’ve ever heard of. The university’s mandatory health plan will now provide coverage for students’ transgender surgery. Wow.

Filed under: Current Events, education, , , , ,

Good Hair

I just watched  Chris Rock’s documentary Good Hair.

Rock does a good job of exploring the aspects of black women’s hair choices that he finds problematic, especially the fact that most black American women’s styles emulate European hair. The meme that black styles emulate white hair has a legitimately problematic history. The racially fraught nature of the ‘straighter is better’ meme becomes more apparent when partnered with the colorist meme that blacks with lighter skin are more beautiful). At one point in the movie, a hair-stylist mentions that moms want their young daughters’ hair relaxed because its unmanageable. I’ve heard this defense before and it usually strikes me as disingenuous. Thinking about my own hair though, I think the manageability issue has a degree of salience.

I have super thick, coarse, curly, frizzy dark blond hair. It’s not nappy like black hair, but– to give you a sense of how far away it is from being straight and silky– if I brush out my hair (styled in a bob) it will stand on end in what can best be described as a Euro Afro. I’ve always worn my hair curly. I blow dry and iron it straight two or three times a year, but I’ve never had it chemically straightened and am sure that I never will. Though I think my curly hair is beautiful (even gorgeous!) when I wash, dry and style it properly, sleeping on it transforms it into crazy-person hair. It really annoys me that I can’t just comb it in order to make it look sane. I’m about 80% Irish, 5% Welsh, 5% English, 5% Dutch and 5% French and I too have occasional dreams of silky straight shiny locks that lay down.

Filed under: Movies, Personal, Society, , , , , , ,

On appreciating Africa

From Loveisntenough:

Do [you] acknowledge that there is no such thing as one African culture–that the continent is one of many nations and peoples with unique cultures? Do you, for instance, work to teach your son about his Ethiopian heritage rather than “generic Africa?”

Do you recognize modern-day Congolese, South Africans or Kenyans as real, living, breathing and nuanced people?

Earlier I posted about my reluctance to teach pre-schoolers to appreciate Africa as part of Black History Month at my school. I don’t like making generalizations about the continent and I don’t think it’s ok to host a project which makes assumptions about each student’s unique heritage and about their families’ attitude towards that heritage. I think the questions asked in the loveisntenough post address this issue quite well.

Filed under: education, Personal, Society, , , , , , , , ,

a great conversation

Just had a really productive transAtlantic g-chat conversation today with a friend living in Paris, whom I have dubbed Paris.
It’s a good follow up of previous posts about whites exploring race in a public setting, and about different attitudes towards white guilt, black comedy and discursive reappropriation in art. This part of the conversation was prompted by my earlier post about John Mayer.
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Paris: i just dont really get why it kind of seems like [Mayer] gets away with stuff like that likes it charming or cool
me: ya, i don’t get it either. but, i guess he’s not really getting away with it
he’s had two ridiculous interviews and tabloids have gone nuts
fortunately i think he’s beginning to realize that he needs to shut up. his apology for using the n-word is better than many publicity-focused apologies about such things
also, have you seen Chris Rock’s Kill?
if not you must.
100% pure genius.
Paris: yes! athena and i actually watched it the other night
we were crying laughing
me: ah! so fun!I think I’d enjoy watching it like once a month
Paris: i started writing something about bamboozled
so i was watching it. but then i got all tangled up and confused and had to leave it. this was like, last week, but maybe ill give it another crack this week
me: what drew you in?
— i haven’t seen it
Paris: oh gosh! you should rent it
im not sure actually how it got started. i think because athena and i were talking about dave chappelle?
me: cool- i will. i haven’t read very good reviews, but i imagine it’s interesting regardlesss
Paris: i have no idea exactly how it got to bamboozled.
me: wow– haven’t thought about him in a while!
what happened to him. i guess his show had an expiration date. oh right–he went crazy too.
Paris: he did, yes. but i guess we got from dave chapelle to bamboozled bc we were talking about what it is for white people to like, participate in black comedy and what kind of issues it does or does not bring up Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Media & Culture, On TV, Personal, Philosophy & Theory, Pop Culture, Society, Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , ,

Sans Hood Pass: Daniel Tosh

Daniel Tosh

Prick or Not a Prick? Who cares. He's funny.

To continue today’s previous train of thought:

If you haven’t watched Tosh.O yet, get to it! I’m a little embarrassed by how much I look forward to the Wednesday at 10:30 on Comedy Central television event. Daniel Tosh is definitely a prick on the show, and probably is in real life, but it’s just so funny. In a nutshell, he finds the funniest clips since Grape Stomp and multiplies their comedic value 10x by pushing the envelope of all social mores regarding race, gender, sexuality, obesity, poverty, drugs, everything. Also, there are a lot of clips of people falling. Annnnnyways, back to the point…

Tosh is white–as is most of his audience. If you watch the show a few times, you’ll gather from his asides about privilege/money that he had a fairly privileged upbringing which has not earned him a ‘hood pass.’ Instead of joking about race under the pretense that he has earned some sort of right or has a unique credibility, Tosh uses the audience’s cultural memory of race issues and their subsequent discomfort with white people making comedy involving black people to great comedic effect. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: On TV, Personal, Pop Culture, Uncategorized, , , , , , ,

Sans Hood Pass: John Mayer

Has difficulty closing his mouth.

I’m interested in the way some young white people on TV and mass media have started to talk casually about racial stuff– and black people in particular–without eschewing their own whiteness. Obviously white political commentators and culture critics have always had the go-ahead to  talk about race in the context of news and art, but I think the phenomenon of whites talking about race and black people in a more personal context with less titration is much newer. I think John Mayer (in his couple of startlingly unfiltered interviews) and Daniel Tosh (of Comedy Central’s hilarious Tosh.0) are the best examples of this. Perhaps Stephen Colbert is a predecessor to this newly emerging casual racial discourse, though I think the fact that his show is thoroughly contrived satire makes his media impact considerably different.

Mayer’s blissfully frank, nearly manic sex-obsessed comments have been a hot topic on celebrity blogs for weeks now. Upon first read, all of his comments rub me the wrong way. It’s gross how sex-obsessed his interviews have been (but then again one of them was in Playboy). Hearing about his quest for “the Joshua Tree of vaginas,” one on which he might “pitch a tent on and just camp out on for, like, a weekend,” and his eternal love of Jennifer Aniston despite their (unremarkable) age difference makes me even less likely to give his make-out session blues a second listen. But, aside from his downright racist comment about Kerry Washington and his use of the n-word while discussing his ‘hood pass’, I can’t say that I am offended by the content of his personal statements. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Current Events, Media & Culture, Pop Culture, , , , ,

A striking piece of reflection

From a guest contributor on Racialicious— a self examination of male identity, race and disability. Powerfully written and startling.

self exposure

Filed under: Personal, Society, , , ,

Such a perfect re-iteration

Breeze Harper at Sistah Vegan quotes from an essay by Sarah Ahmed who characterizes many Whiteness studies as being “non-performative” in that “they do not do what they say.” Ahmed writes that many of these declarations of whiteness are ‘admissions’ of ‘bad practice’ [which] are taken up as signs of ‘good practice’.

Ahmed’s full paper here at Borderlands

Filed under: Philosophy & Theory, Society, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

Age Appropriate Black History Month

I commented on loveisntenough.com earlier and thought it would be appropriate to repost here in slightly edited and expanded form. Sorry if some of the background info is redundant to readers of this blog!:

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I’ve been thinking about the huge variety of opinions regarding what should be involved in Black History Month. I’m not a mom [really only relevant to the fact that this was first written for loveisntenough.com] – I run an afterschool program at a charter school for 3yr olds to Kindergartners with a 95% black population. On Monday my employees and I started to plan activities for the week and to kick off BHM. I’m white and the three employees are black. Each of us had very divergent thoughts about what the focus of BHM is– probably thoughts you’ve all heard before. What really interested me though was the divergence of opinion on what race issues are appropriate to talk about with 3 yr olds. One person wanted to do a project in which the kids placed pictures/drawings of their families on the continent of Africa to symbolize heritage. I’m very in favor of teaching kids as much African history as we do European history, but I really didn’t like this project for three year olds. Firstly, I’m not confident that they would understand the idea. But secondly, I think it’s problematic to treat the continent of Africa as a unified monolithic landmass from whence all black Americans came, with absolutely no knowledge which countries the families’ have actually come from. [Granted, I imagine that it is quite hard for black Americans to trace their lineage back to Africa because of the discontinuity and trauma caused by slavery.]

One of the other people wanted to do a project focusing on the idea that “difference is beautiful/special.” I totally agree that acceptance and respect for one’s differences should be instilled in all children, but I wasn’t comfortable with planting the idea of black as different in the kids’ heads. They go to an all black school in which I don’t think there’s any reason why they would think of themselves as different. While I’m sure they have an awareness of different skin colors and perhaps vague awareness of cultural differences, I’m not convinced that they already associate racial issues with the tension and discomfort that I think this project idea was ultimately intended to address. I’d love to hear thoughts from parents with young kids!

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